Parts of an NA Locomotive

Move your mouse cursor over the photograph below to identify parts of the locomotive. Your browser may not support the area tag. In this case the in tended display won't work. IE does work. Mozilla does not work for me./p>


Funnel: Directs the exhaust steam and smoke from the boiler away from the driver. Whistle: Used as a signal to railway workers and a warning to all along the track. Safety Valve: Releases excess steam pressure from the boiler. There are two of these. Safety Valve: Releases excess steam pressure from the boiler. There are two of these. Turbo Generator exhaust. The turbo generator generates electricity for the lights. In this photo it is hidden behind the Fireman's lunch box. Fireman's Lunch Box. It is kept outside the cab because there is not enough room inside. Fireman: One of the two crew . Cab ventilator. Side of Cab with windows, narrow door and hand rail. Coal Bunker: This holds the coal. There is an opening at the bottom into the cab so the fireman can shovel coal into the firebox. Front Sand Dome: This contains fine dry sand which the driver can put on the rail (via a pipe) before the front wheels, to give added grip when the locomotive is running forwards.  Rear Sand Dome: This contains fine dry sand which the driver can put on the rail (via a pipe) behind the rear driving wheels,  to give added grip when the locomotive is running backwards. Steam Dome: This separates the steam from the boiling water in the boiler. It is very hot. Number Plate: A number that identifies the particular locomotive. There is one on each side. Left hand Water Tank: There is another tank on the right hand side. These contain the water for the boiler. The boiler is between the two water tanks. Water Tank Filling Hole: This is where water is put into the water tanks. The two tanks are connected by a pipe so that if one tank is full so is the other. Air Compressor: This provides compressed air for the air brakes. Smoke Box: This is the front part of the boiler where steam from the cylinders is mixed with smoke from the boiler and exhausted out of the funnel. It is very hot. Smokebox Door: The two handles allow this to be opened so that ash can be cleaned from the smokebox. It is very hot. Ash Chute: Guides ash removed from the smolebox off the locomotive. Right hand Front Marker Lamp. This can be set to show a white or red light as needed. Left hand Front Marker Lamp. This can be set to show a white or red light as needed. Head light: In spite of its small size this is a powerful headlight. In olden days drivers were not expected to see where they were going at night. A small marker light was used so that the engine could be seen. Locomotive tool box. This large box contains tools and spare parts that may be required on a trip. Brake Hose: This hose connects to a brake hose on another vehicle (or engine) to carry the compressed air to the other vehicle's brakes. The brake pipe is continuous in all vehicles. If the driver lets air out of the brake pipe the brakes on every vehicle go on. Coupler: This couples to a similar coupler on another vehicle or locomotive to provide a strong join so the train does not come apart. Cowcatcher: Should something get on the track the cowwcatcher may throw it off the track, rather than the locomotive run over it. Injector: This device uses steam pressure to force water into the boiler. There is another on the Driver's side. Pony wheels. (Hidden behind the steam.) There are two pony wheels at the front and rear of the locomotive. These help guide the locomotive around bends. Pony wheels are smaller than the driving wheels. Smoke Box Irons: These are steel rakes used when cleaning the smokebox. Valve Chest: This is where the valves let steam into the cylinder to push the pistons Cylinder: Here the steam pushes the piston backwards and forwards. This is unlike a car engine where the pistons are only pushed one way.  There is a piston on each side. Connecting Rod: Connects the piston rod to the centre axle. This turns the axle as the piston and piston rod moves backwards and forwards. There is a connecting rod each side. The connecting rod on one side is arranged to drive the centre axle 90° behind the other connecting rod.. Side Rods. These connect the centre axle to the front rear axle thus giving this locomotive six-wheel drive. Locomotive Frame: The frame holds the wheels and axles together. The driving wheels are inside the frame.

6A was built in 1901 by the Victorian Railways at Newport Workshops. It is one of Puffing Billy's NA classs of locomotives. In a recent overhaul (in the Puffing Billy Railway workshops) 6A was given a modern design exhaust system (in the smoke box) that makes it more powerful that other NAs. This new design also makes the locomotive use steam more efficiently and thus 6A has a softer exhaust than the other NAs.


This page is © copyright 2008 and maintained by Bill Russell bill.russell@optusnet.com.au
Created: 15/6/2008 Last update: 28/1/2014
URL: http://www.members.optusnet.com.au/~narrow.gauge/locoparts.htm